Monday, August 13, 2018

Fairhill Road Rockefeller Park (8/12/2018)

Sunday, August 12, 2018
Fairhill Road Rockefeller Park appears to be the area along Doan Brook between North Park Boulevard in Cleveland Heights to the north and Fairhill Road in Cleveland and Shaker Heights to the south. The east end is at Coventry Road and the west end at Martin Luther King Jr Drive.
The Land to Lakes Bicycle Trail runs along Fairhill Road;
here we are in Shaker Heights looking west into Cleveland
Another "circle" along the Lake to Lakes Trail,
which runs from Lake Erie to the Shaker Lakes,
 specifically Lower Shaker Lake
A rock marking the site of the Shaker community
1844-1886 Gristmill, along the Lake to Lakes Trail,
across from Kemper Road
Doan Brook
A Lake to Lakes Trail Self Bike Repair Station
at Coventry Road and North Park Boulevard in Cleveland Heights
I am guessing this is a Meripilus sumstinei fungus
as we were in an area of oak trees
A WWI memorial marker, but this is
not under a 100-year old oak tree!
Bronze plaque for John Francis Kelley
Liberty Row Oaks was a living memorial
to fallen soldiers of World War I
Red oak trees were planted on what was North Park Boulevard from Cleveland through Cleveland Heights to Shaker Heights, with small (about 4" diameter) bronze plaques each bearing a name of a soldier. Liberty Row Oaks was dedicated on Memorial Day in 1919.
This plaque was nudged to one side by its oak tree
Bronze plaque for Frank D Kennedy
We saw at least a dozen plaques, some broken
And fewer with an American flag
A total of 850 trees were planted from Gordon Park near Lake Erie along what was then Lower Boulevard/Liberty Boulevard (now Martin Luther King Jr Drive) in Cleveland, continuing along North Park Boulevard in Cleveland Heights, and along several streets in Shaker Heights almost to Warrensville Center Road, for about nine miles.
Stone steps down towards Doan Brook,
near where Delaware Drive hits N Park Blvd
A terrace overlooking a stormwater bioretention basin
at Martin Luther King Jr Dr and Fairhill Road
The stormwater bioretention basin, where runoff can be
naturally filtered before being absorbed into the ground,
or in this case directed into Doan Brook
Solar-powered light
Fairhill Road Village
Fairhill Road Village was designed in "English Cotswold" Tudor Revival style to resemble an English hamlet. For some mysterious reason, it is also known as Belgian Village. The concept was originally designed by architect Antonio DiNardo, but in 1929 Harold O Fullerton took over the project. Landscape architect A Donald Gray was also involved. The development was built on a rock dump created in 1915 from the excavation for the Fairmount Reservoir.
There are five two-family dwellings and three single-family dwellings.
12309 Fairhill Road (one family unit, built c 1930, architect unknown)
12321-5 Fairhill Road (2-family unit, built 1929, architect unknown)
12329-12403 Fairhill Road (2-family unit, built 1930, architect H Fullerton)
Three of the units are grouped around a drive and greenspace;
12407-12411 Fairhill Rd (2-family unit, built 1930, architect H Fullerton),
12415-12419 Fairhill Rd (2-family unit, built c 1930, architect unknown),
12425-12427 Fairhill Rd (2-family unit, built c 1930, architect unknown)
The hiccup is this one family home built in 1971,
designed by Harlan E Sherman, at 12501 Fairhill Road
12511 Fairhill Road (one family unit, built c 1936, architect unknown)
The house at 12321 Fairhill Road is for sale at $549,900, and at 12419 Fairhill Road at $499,000. All the houses have living rooms that face the Doan Brook ravine in the rear.